Today we’re kicking off a new series to help you get to know our authors! We’ve asked them all a series of questions and will be releasing their answers between now and the end of the year. We already learned a little about Erica Crouch, and today we get to learn more about Pauline!


 

paulineWhat was the first book you wrote? Published?
The first actual book-length piece of fiction I ever wrote was a book called The Secrets of Evelyn Taylor. It’s a middle grade, science fiction, mystery. It’s also the first book I published, but I was thirteen so it’s not all that great. Hopefully my books now are much better.

Which author do you most look up to?
I love Veronica Roth. Her writing is amazing and she’s also a pretty young author – she wrote Divergent in college – which makes her really inspirational.

What is your ultimate goal as an author?
My ultimate goal would be to create books that people enjoy reading. The best thing ever is to receive emails from readers telling you how much they loved your book. To me, that’s the best reason to write. So my goal is to keep writing better and better books that readers will continue to love.

Which of your characters do you most connect with?Puppet
That would be James from my Pinocchio retelling, Puppet. He’s basically the guy version of me. He’s quiet, reserved, thinks things through…very much like me.

What is your favorite genre to read? Why?
I’m a hardcore science fiction fan and I always will be. I grew up with Star Trek and Robert Heinlein so anything set in space is my cup of tea. It’ll always have a special place in my heart.

What is the most challenging part of your writing process?
Finding time in my crazy college schedule. It’s so frustrating because I have all the ideas and inspiration but I need to go study for that test I have instead of sitting down to write.

Do you have any go to snacks while writing?
Mostly just tea. Food tends to distract me.

What is your all-time favorite novel to read?
I don’t reread novels very often, but the only series I’ve read multiple times is the Maximum Ride Series by James Patterson. It’s the series that inspired me to be a writer, so I love it to death.

What do you consider your greatest strength as an author?
I think (or at least hope) I have a way of capturing the reader’s attention and pulling them through the whole story.

pauline2What is the best writing advice you’ve ever received?
Write like no one’s reading. This made a huge difference in my writing life. Instead of thinking, “Oh god, what’s my mom going to think of this?” I just started writing what felt risky and awesome and stuff just got so much better.


If you couldn’t be an author, what would be your next choice for a dream job?

I’d love to be an astronaut. Basically just so I could say I’m an astronaut and totally win the “I have the coolest job” competition in any group gathering. But realistically (because honestly being an astronaut looks too hard) I’d love to be an editor of some type.

How long does it usually take you to write a book from plotting to publishing?
Usually about a year. It only takes me about a month to write the book but I take a while to edit it to perfection.

Tell us something fun about yourself, completely unrelated to writing!
I have two goats. They don’t anything, they’re just cute.


 

Learn more about Pauline at Pauline.Patchwork-Press.com

 

Today we’re kicking off a new series to help you get to know our authors! We’ve asked them all a series of questions and will be releasing their answers between now and the end of the year. First up, Erica Crouch!

erica
What was the first book you wrote? Published?
The first real book I wrote was a story about an orphanage for witches. I still love the idea, but its execution was horrendous (because I was very young and super unaware of all of the terrible cliches I was employing). I may revisit this idea some day and see if I can give it new life!
 
The first book I published was Ignite (June 2013). It is a young adult paranormal and the first of five books in the Ignite series. And it’s also free on all platforms now — a great way to jump into the series!
 
Which author do you most look up to?
I really love Libba Bray (which I think I’ve said a thousand times before). I am always in awe of her world building and the way she can weave multiple characters’ storylines together to create an incredible story!
 
Sarah J Maas is also really high up on my list! She just has an incredible way with words and crafting really dynamic characters.
 
What is your ultimate goal as an author?Madly Deeply
To write stories people will remember, with characters they can relate to. And maybe make people laugh (or cry) ((or both)).
 
Which of your characters do you most connect with?
Typical author answer, but I think I connect a little bit with all of my characters, even the dark ones. Otherwise, they’d be too difficult to write! If I couldn’t relate to them/understand their motives, it’d be near impossible to get into their head and believe in what I was writing. The character I wish I was most like is probably Kalaziel (Ignite series). She’s a freaking treat and I wish I was half as upbeat/unfailingly positive as she is!
 
What is your favorite genre to read? Why?
Fantasy. There are such high stakes in fantasy, and most fantasy books I pick up I find difficult to set back down again. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good contemporary, and scifi is also one of my favorites, but fantasy books are always the ones that have me thinking the most interesting thoughts as I read them!
 
What is the most challenging part of your writing process?
Starting! I think first drafts are the hardest leg of the writing/publishing process (see: Surviving First Drafts) because there’s so much ahead of you that it can get a little intimidating to actually start writing. And then, once I start writing, I always struggle to keep up my momentum and word count. Life gets hectic, and I have to remind myself not to let my writing fall by the wayside sometimes.
 
Do you have any go to snacks while writing?
Anything I can grab a handful of and shove in my mouth without getting grease/butter/etc. on my hands. I wish I could eat popcorn or chips while writing, but then I spend all my time cleaning my fingers before typing again. So I usually stick to candy, or a breakfast bar. And water — or when it gets cold, hot chocolate or apple cider! Not a big coffee/tea drinker.
 
EnticeWhat is your all-time favorite novel to read?
The Diviners by Libba Bray. Murder, mystery, ghosts, the 1920s — all of my favorite things!
 
What do you consider your greatest strength as an author?
I’d like to answer something specific about my writing itself, but I’d probably have to say revisions is actually my greatest strength. That’s where I take the mess of my first draft and really make it shine. It’s the time when I can work on my story at a really detailed level, and it’s where I come up with some of my favorite lines.
 
What is the best writing advice you’ve ever received?
Never look back.
 
If you could have a literary tea party with five of your favorite characters and five of your favorite authors, alive or dead, who would they be?
Five characters: Hermione Granger (Harry Potter), Celaena Sardothian (Throne of Glass), Gemma Doyle (A Great and Terrible Beauty), Feyre (A Court of Thorns and Roses), Johanna Mason (The Hunger Games). Probably less tea party and more girl-powered kickass brunch with endless bacon and pancakes. 
 
Five authors: Libba Bray, Sarah J Maas, Edgar Allan Poe, JK Rowling, F Scott Fitzgerald. It’d be an eclectic bunch!
 
What’s the best thing about being a writer?
Hearing from readers who were able to connect with something I’ve written. I could get a thousand bad reviews and they mean nothing when compared to one positive comment from a reader.
 
If you couldn’t be an author, what would be your next choice for a dream job?
I have no idea! When I was in high school and thinking “practically” about my life, I imagined I’d end up working in journalism in some capacity. I think I wanted to go into print journalism, and I think it would have been a lot of fun to go into investigative journalism. 
My first semester of college, I was studying Forensic Anthropology (you know that show Bones? Yeah — that). I also wanted to become an Egyptologist or an archeologist or anthropologist for a while, and still do in my wildest dreams. Not necessarily the most traditional of jobs, but then again neither is being a writer. 
 
I think I’d still want to be involved in telling stories of some kind, obviously — whether they were about history, or culture, or crime.
 
How long does it usually take you to write a book from plotting to publishing?
If my brain is behaving and I’m actually on schedule? Around 3 months. The first month is writing, the second month is revising, and the third month is all of the publishing (formatting, blog tour, etc). Sometimes — many times — it takes a little longer than that. But once I hit my stride, the writing happens pretty quickly!
 
What is your favorite place to write?11412214_10203693908223186_8044098458315904319_n
At home, alone. I can’t write very well with other people around; it’s distracting. I need to completely unplug myself from the real world so I can get some serious work done. To do that, I sit at my desk, turn on whatever playlist I’ve put together for the manuscript I’m working on, and then zone out and get words on the page.
 
Tell us something fun about yourself, completely unrelated to writing!

Part of me has always secretly wanted to move way out of the city to live in the middle of nowhere on a huge plot of land so I can get a dozen dogs and a pack of pygmy goats. And the videos of goats wearing onesie pajamas that keep going around Facebook are not helping to dissuade this ridiculous fantasy.

Find more about Erica online at Erica.Patchwork-Press.com

9781927940518

 

“In this form you shall remain until a princess shows no disdain.”

Long before Andi discovers Elorium, an orphan girl befriends an enchanted frog while her cursed stepsister plots revenge in a twist that can only transpire in a fairy tale.

This stand-alone prequel to the Grimm Tales follows Cynthia, Andi’s grandmother, who is dragged in to the palace’s circle of glitter and privilege by her stepmother. Lady Wellington’s obsessive quest for a crown for one of her daughters has ensnared Cynthia and her musical talent in her scheme. Cynthia turns the nightmarish concert into a gesture of true friendship in an attempt to reverse the curse of a frog prince.

Attempting to be invisible to her abusive stepfamily while sidestepping the arrogant prince, Cynthia searches for an understanding princess to change Remi back to his rightful form.

Things do not go as planned when Remi disappears, leaving their friendship in his wake. Meanwhile, the single-minded Prince Wilhelm is determined to make Cynthia his bride. With a cursed stepsister threatening to upend Cynthia’s delicately balanced situation, her time in Elorium is drawing to a close as revelations of who she is and the truth about their world comes to light in this reimagined fairy tale.


 

Today we’d like to wish the happiest of release days to A Grimm Curse by Janna Jennings! This is a companion novella to her wonderful Grimm Tales series that you can read either before or after jumping in with A Grimm Legacy, book one in the series. If you’re a fan of classic fairy tales, you won’t want to miss this wonderful new story!

Get the Books
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